2 or 3 Things I Know About Film
Dedicated to the art of cinema.
beauludget:

Paul Schrader’s outline for Raging Bull

beauludget:

Paul Schrader’s outline for Raging Bull

October 15, 2012
"You're Gonna Die in Hell/Betsy's Theme/Hitting the Girl" by Bernard Herrmann

"You’re Gonna Die in Hell/Betsy’s Theme/Hitting the Girl" (Extract)
From Taxi Driver (1976)
Composed by Bernard Herrmann 

September 11, 2012

On the set of Brian De Palma’s Obsession (1976).

July 22, 2012
"

We meet, I write a script. He reads it, we meet again. I polish the script, I hand it in. I disappear. That’s what the working relationship is [with Martin Scorsese]. After I hand it in, I’m gone. I don’t call, I don’t ask; he makes the movie. I’ve done my job. If the script is really good, it will inspire him to be better, and that’s the best I can do.


I always feel that the presence of the writer on the set is one of the sheer indicators that something has gone awry, because by the time a movie begins shooting, the actor should understand the character as well as the writer, and the director should understand the structure and the style as well, or better, than the writer. And if they still need the writer at that point, then they probably started shooting too quickly.

"
Paul Schrader on working with Martin Scorsese
Cliff Robertson in Obsession (1976)

Cliff Robertson in Obsession (1976)

Robert Mitchum in The Yakuza (1974)

Robert Mitchum in The Yakuza (1974)

"Taxi Driver: A Night Piece for Orchestra - Blues"
From Bernard Herrmann: The Film Scores

Composed by Bernard Herrmann
Conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen

Thai poster art for Cat People (1982)

Thai poster art for Cat People (1982)

Turkish poster art for American Gigolo (1980)

Turkish poster art for American Gigolo (1980)

Paul Schrader
Born July 22, 1946 

"… The last scene of the movie should play on the sidewalk outside the theater. And the movie should insight your imagination to the degree that you walk outside and start talking and arguing about it with someone else. If the film answers all the questions for you, I don’t find it terribly interesting. A lot of people go to movies for just that reason—not to think. They go to the movies to blank out. I understand the temptation of that. It’s a powerful temptation. It’s the same reason you play slot machines: you don’t really play to win, you play to blank out. I just don’t find that much of a reason to make a movie, to provide people with a narcotic to blot out two hours of their lives." 

 
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